About Me

shu-wen2

Haverford College, October 2013

I am a clinical and cultural psychologist whose research examines stress, coping, and health and well-being in the context of relationships and families.  I study social behavior, with an emphasis on social support process, and its links with mental health and biological stress responses (e.g., the HPA-axis and cortisol reactivity).  For example, how does job stress impact social interactions with family members in the home, and how do depression and neuroticism affect supportive interactions with one’s partner?  In particular, one branch of my work examines cultural factors that moderate these linkages with a focus on Asian American mental health.  For example, how do interdependence values that prioritize group harmony shape support use and stress responding differently for Asian American groups compared to European American groups?   A secondary area of interest is on patterns of emotion expression and regulation as they are linked with distress.  Work in this area has addressed everyday patterns of emotion expression in families, and the cultural shaping of emotion recognition and emotion display processes.  I specialize in the intensive observation and coding of social interaction, both in the laboratory and in naturalistic contexts.  A previous line of research examined coping and relationship changes in the context of vision loss.

My work has been published in scientific journals such as Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Journal of Family Psychology, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, Asian American Journal of Psychology, Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology, and Journal of Occupational Health Psychology.  In 2016, I was honored with the Early Career Award for Distinguished Contribution to Science from the Asian American Psychological Association.  In 2017, I was honored with the Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions in Research from the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program.

APA 2017 Early Career Award

Receiving the 2017 Early Career Award for Distinguished Contribution to Research from Mr. Andrew T Dailey, MDiv, MS, Director of the American Psychological Association Minority Fellowship Program in Washington, DC.

 

Receiving the 2016 Early Career Award for Science from the Asian American Psychological Association in Denver, CO.

Receiving the 2016 Early Career Award for Distinguished Contribution to Science from Dr. Kevin Nadal, PhD, and Dr. Helen Hsu, PsyD, President and President-Elect of the Asian American Psychological Association in Denver, CO.

I have been an Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychology at Haverford College since 2012, and I am a licensed clinical psychologist in the state of Pennsylvania (PS017847).  I currently have a small clinical practice at Bryn Mawr Psychological Associates.  I received my BA in Psychology and Anthropology from Barnard College, and my MA and PhD in Clinical Psychology from UCLA.  I completed my predoctoral clinical internship at the West Los Angeles VA Medical Center, and my postdoctoral clinical residency at the Center for Cognitive Therapy in the Department of Psychiatry at University of Pennsylvania.

In my spare time, I enjoy tea and a good book, trying new foods, and spending time with my husband and my three beautiful children.